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HEMOPHILIA.ORG > BLEEDING DISORDERS INFO CENTER >
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Psychosocial Issues

People with bleeding disorders face physical, psychological, financial, and employment challenges. How well they meet these challenges depends on many issues. These include the severity of their disorder, the quality and availability of medical care, their level of insurance coverage and ability to pay for care, and the strength of their personal support networks.

Parents raising a child with a bleeding disorder have many issues to address. Some are practical concerns, like health insurance coverage and choosing the best treatments for the child. Another concern is how to deal with the child's emotional responses to living with a chronic health problem. If the child with a bleeding disorder has siblings, they too will have emotional responses to living in a family with a member who has a chronic health problem. Finally, one must balance helping the child lead as active a life as possible with protecting his or her well-being.

For adults and children alike, the physical hardships and limitations imposed by bleeding disorders often have emotional and social impacts. A hospitalization or a period of limited mobility is stressful as well as disruptive to school, work, and family life. Planning one's life around health concerns or making job decisions based on access to adequate health insurance also can have a profound personal and practical impact. Adults who have a severe bleeding disorder sometimes encounter discrimination by prospective employers. These are just some of the issues faced by people with chronic health conditions and their families.

Disclaimer
The information contained on the NHF web site is provided for your general information only. NHF does not give medical advice or engage in the practice of medicine. NHF under no circumstances recommends particular treatment for specific individuals and in all cases recommends that you consult your physician or local treatment center before pursuing any course of treatment.
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