NHF funds a broad range of research programs that seek to increase our understanding of the science behind bleeding disorders, how they affect people's lives, and pathways to better treatments and cures.

Mechanisms of Flow-regulated VWF-platelet Adhesion at Different Length Scales

Mechanisms of Flow-regulated VWF-platelet Adhesion at Different Length Scales

Year:
-
Grants:
Judith Graham Pool Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Von Willebrand Disease
Author(s):
Klaus Bonazza

Klaus Bonazza received his Ph.D. in chemistry from Vienna University of Technology. He is currently a postdoctoral researcher at Boston Children's Hospital and appointed at Harvard Medical School, mentored by Dr. Timothy Springer. His field of interest is the ultra-large concatemeric protein von Willebrand factor (VWF), which accounts for the adaptability of hemostasis to different flow conditions in the blood vessels.

At moderate, physiological flow VWF has a packed, "bird nest's" shape whereas strong elongational flow conditions, occurring downstream of vascular restrictions or injuries, induce a transition to a threat-like, elongated state. On top of this overall unpacking, tensile forces, which are exerted on the chain and transmitted by its A1 domain, cause local conformational changes which activate binding of thrombocyte receptor Glycoprotein Ib (GPIbα) to initiate coagulation. With his JGP fellowship award, Dr. Bonazza will pioneer a new method to obtain structural insights into force dependent VWF unpacking, A1 deformation and GPIbα binding based on hydrogendeuterium exchange under elongational flow conditions.

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Women with Hemophilia: Gender-based Differences in the Delivery of Comprehensive Care

Year: 2018
Grants:
Physical Therapy Excellence Fellowship
Author(s):
Laura Fox

This study will evaluate hemophilia treatment center (HTC) services provided to women with hemophilia A or B (Factor VIII or Factor IX level [ 50%). The American Thrombosis and Hemostasis Network (ATHN) maintains a confidential national database for patients with bleeding and clotting disorders. Utilizing this existing ATHNdataset, the study will analyze the effect of gender on the delivery of comprehensive care in patients with hemophilia A and B. The project will focus on how gender impacts three specific components of care: identification of patients with factor VIII or IX deficiency, inclusion of patients in the comprehensive care model, and monitoring of joint bleeding as a key component of comprehensive care provided by HTCs. Demonstrating gender-based disparities in comprehensive care would provide evidence for making changes to improve the clinical care provided to women with hemophilia. This study will add to the knowledge regarding the care of women with hemophilia, helping to inform future studies of this under-researched population.

Structural Biology of Blood Coagulation Proteins and Their Complexes

Structural Biology of Blood Coagulation Proteins and Their Complexes

Year:
-
Grants:
Judith Graham Pool Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Hemophilia A (Factor VIII/F8)
Hemophilia B (Factor IX/F9)
Author(s):
Shekhar Kumar
Per Dr. Kumar, the JGP Fellowship has enabled him to test his ideas related to factor V biology. It has facilitated his scientific training to become increasingly independent in the planning and execution of his research. Important to note, findings generated from these studies have provided new concepts and tools to target factor V for therapeutic purposes. After the completion of his award in 2018, Dr. Kumar would like to continue his career in the field of hematology.
Analysis of Blood Clot Structure and Function in the Presence and Absence of von Willebrand Factor

Analysis of Blood Clot Structure and Function in the Presence and Absence of von Willebrand Factor

Year:
-
Grants:
Judith Graham Pool Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Von Willebrand Disease
Author(s):
Megan S. Rost

Dr. Megan Rost is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Michigan. She received a B.S in biochemistry and biotechnology from Michigan State University, and her Ph.D. in molecular and developmental biology at the University of Cincinnati - Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. Her graduate work focused on understanding vascular endothelial development using zebrafish as a model organism. In July 2015, she joined the lab of Dr. Jordan Shavit in the Department of Pediatrics and Hematology/Oncology at University of Michigan. For her 2016 JGP research fellowship project, she will be using the zebrafish model to analyze blood clot structure and function in the presence and absence of von Willebrand Factor. In studying this, Dr. Rost will be elucidating how arterial thrombus formation occurs in the absence of VWF, aiding in uncovering possible new therapeutic targets for VWD treatment.

Investigation of VWF as an Immunomodulator of the Immunogenic Response Towards FVIII

Investigation of VWF as an Immunomodulator of the Immunogenic Response Towards FVIII

Year: 2018
Grants:
Bridge Award
Von Willebrand Disease
Hemophilia A (Factor VIII/F8)
Inhibitors
Author(s):
Qizhen Shi

Dr. Shi is a Professor of Pediatric Hematology at the Medical College of Wisconsin and an Investigator of Blood Research Institute at the BloodCenter of Wisconsin. She earned her MD from Fujian Medical University in China in 1990 and her Ph.D. in 1998. Dr. Shi’s research focus is to formulate innovative therapeutic approaches for the treatment of hemophilia A, a genetic bleeding disorder caused by a lack of the critical blood clotting protein, factor VIII (FVIII). One of her research programs funded by the National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, is to develop platelet-specific gene transfer strategies for the treatment of hemophilia A and hemophilia A with neutralizing antibodies. In the project supported by the NHF Bridge Grant, Dr. Shi will investigate the potential effect of the FVIII carrier protein, von Willebrand factor, on FVIII immune responses in hemophilia A. Dr. Shi expects that results from her studies will aid the design of more effective protocols to prevent FVIII immune responses and to induce FVIII immune tolerance in patients with HA.

Sabrina Farina

Improving the Quality of Life for the Aging Patient with Hemophilia

Year: 2018
Grants:
Social Work Excellence Fellowship
Author(s):
Sabrina Farina

As a social worker at Gulf States Hemophilia & Thrombophilia Treatment Center, I have the privilege of serving patients across their lifespan. I would like to initiate grass roots education about hemophilia in Houston, Texas, by offering educational programming to specialized health care professionals who work directly with the aging population in nursing homes and assisted living communities. This would include executive directors and administrators of these facilities as well as direct clinical staff.

Understanding the Loss of Perivascular Tissue Factor during Angiogenesis in Hemophilia

Understanding the Loss of Perivascular Tissue Factor during Angiogenesis in Hemophilia

Year:
-
Grants:
Judith Graham Pool Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Hemophilia A (Factor VIII/F8)
Hemophilia B (Factor IX/F9)
Author(s):
Laura Sommerville

Dr. Laura Sommerville graduated cum laude from Messiah College and then obtained her MS and PhD degrees in cellular and molecular biology from Temple University. Her graduate work and doctoral dissertation produced several awards and publications in peer reviewed publications. She has been a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Maureane Hoffman at Duke University since July 2014. Dr. Sommerville's 2015 JGP research fellowship award project is on understanding the loss of perivascular tissue factor during angiogenesis in hemophilia.

Mechanisms and Therapeutic Strategies Targeting TAFI-mediated Vascular Remodeling in Hemophilic Arthropathy

Mechanisms and Therapeutic Strategies Targeting TAFI-mediated Vascular Remodeling in Hemophilic Arthropathy

Year:
-
Grants:
Judith Graham Pool Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Hemophilic Arthropathy
Pain
Author(s):
Tine L. Wyseure

Dr. Tine Wyseure obtained her Master’s degree in Drug Discovery and Development, and earned her Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Leuven, Belgium. Since 2015, she has been a research associate in the lab of Dr. Laurent Mosnier at The Scripps Research Institute in San Diego. Dr. Wyseure’s 2016 JGP research fellowship award project is focused on investigating the effects of impaired TAFI activation in hemophilia on the progression of hemophilic joint disease. The lack of active TAFI worsens joint bleeding and chronic inflammation and drives the striking development of fragile blood vessels in diseased joints. In search of the missing link, Dr. Wyseure has discovered a novel paradigm on how the formation of new blood vessels is controlled by TAFI and suggests that patients with hemophilia may lack this control switch, causing the formation of unstable and leaky blood vessels.

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Empowering the Future of Hemophilia through Swimming

Year: 2017
Grants:
Social Work Excellence Fellowship
Author(s):
Anne Phillips

Swimming is an important life skill that benefits hemophilia patients medically and psychosocially. The goal of this project is to provide inner city children and teenagers the opportunity to learn how to swim. The swim program will be held at the Detroit Medical Center, where a team of professionals will teach the basics of swimming with the goal of independent swimming by the end of the program. The team will measure the children's progress medically and psychosocially throughout the program. This program will provide children and teenagers at our HTC with an amazing opportunity and also a very important life skill. We will also be using adult hemophilia patients to teach the children how to swim, which will provide them with work experience and community involvement.

A Multi-System Evaluation of von Willebrand Factor Function in Type I von Willebrand Disease Mutations

A Multi-System Evaluation of von Willebrand Factor Function in Type I von Willebrand Disease Mutations

Year:
-
Grants:
Judith Graham Pool Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Von Willebrand Disease
Author(s):
Christopher Ng

Dr. Christopher Ng was a pediatric hematology/oncology fellow at the University of Colorado - Anschutz Medical Campus. Dr. Ng attended medical school at the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California and completed his pediatrics residency at the University of Washington/Seattle Children's Hospital. Dr. Ng received the NHF-Baxalta Clinical Fellowship in 2013. Dr. Ng's 2015 JGP research fellowship award project focused on a multi-system evaluation of von Willebrand factor function in Type 1 von Willebrand Disease mutations.

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A Feasibility and Usability Study of a Nursing-Orchestrated, Customized Immersive 3 Dimensional Virtual Reality Environment in Children with Hemophilia Undergoing Routine Intravenous Procedures

Year:
-
Grants:
Nursing Excellence Fellowship
Author(s):
Charmaine Biega

The purpose of this project is to request support for the development of a Virtual Reality Environment (VRE) study program for pediatric patients diagnosed with hemophilia. The VRE program proposed was developed and created for children and includes interactive imagery, character avatars and colorful visual environments. This VRE program will be deployed by the child in a clinical setting and is proposed to help decrease, anxiety and needle phobia during intravenous factor infusions. Outcome measures will include an anxiety scale before and after each infusion, collection of biophysiologic data, pain score and visual analogue evaluation. The expected result of this nursing project is to monitor the use of a VRE in the pediatric population with a reduction of fear, anxiety and pain experienced with intravenous factor infusions.

Molecular Basis of Procofactor to Cofactor Activation in FVIII

Molecular Basis of Procofactor to Cofactor Activation in FVIII

Year:
-
Grants:
Judith Graham Pool Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Hemophilia A (Factor VIII/F8)
Author(s):
Sudharsan Parthasarathy

Dr. Parthasarathy's research will tackle two important biological issues in coagulation - namely how procofactor FVIII converts to the active cofactor form (FVIIIa) and binds to IX and X, and the location of FVIII in generating the active Xase complex. Results from this study will provide molecular and biochemical insights into the role of FVIIIa in regulating hemostasis and further elucidate the interactions between coagulation complexes. Dr. Parthasarathy obtained his Masters in Biotechnology from Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi, India and received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Kansas in 2011. He has been a postdoctoral researcher in the lab of Dr. Rodney Camire at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia since July 2011. This award has been made possible through a generous donation from Hemophilia of Georgia, Inc.

Anti-fibrinolytic Strategies to Decrease Bleeding in Hemophilic Arthropathy

Anti-fibrinolytic Strategies to Decrease Bleeding in Hemophilic Arthropathy

Year:
-
Grants:
Career Development Award
Hemophilic Arthropathy
Pain
Author(s):
Annette von Drygalski

Dr. von Drygalski's research focuses on better understanding the mechanisms operating the anti-fibrinolytic system and how this process works in patients with hemophilia and specifically with joint bleeding. Accelerated fibrinolysis and clot instability are becoming increasingly recognized as contributing factors to bleeding in hemophilia. One important molecule that prevents fibrinolysis is called TAFI (Thrombin Activatable Fibrinolysis Inhibitor). Dr. von Drygalski will be studying the dual anti-fibrinolytic and anti-inflammatory functions of TAFI in hemophilia arthropathy and develop a therapeutic TAFI-based approach to improving the efficacy of FVIIa based bypassing strategies for acute bleeding and joint protection. Her mentors and collaborators are John H. Griffin, PhD, Laurent O. Mosnier, PhD and Martin Lotz, MD, distinguished researchers at UCSD -The Scripps Research Institute. Dr. von Drygalski received her M.D. from the Universities of Erlangen/Nurnberg and Munich in 1995 and her Pharm.D. from the University of Munich in 1988. She joined the faculty in July 2011 as Assistant Clinical Professor at UCSD and Director of the Adult Hemophilia and Thrombosis Treatment Center, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine. She also has an appointment as Adjunct Assistant Professor at the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI). The funding for this award is made possible thanks to a generous grant from Novo Nordisk.

Anne Gonzales

Exercise Versus DDAVP in Patients with Mild Hemophilia A - Which Is Better and Do They Work Additively in Improving Hemostasis?

Year: 2016
Grants:
Physical Therapy Excellence Fellowship
Author(s):
Anne Gonzales

Preliminary work done by Dr. Riten Kumar and colleagues has documented that moderate intensity exercise is associated with a significant improvement in multiple coagulation parameters in post-adolescent males with mild-moderate hemophilia A. As a continuation to our previous work, we now hope to compare the impact of moderate intensity exercise to DDAVP on laboratory coagulation parameters in post-adolescent males with mild hemophilia A. We also hope to investigate the impact of sequentially administering these interventions on hemostatic indices. Our over-arching hypothesis is that increase in coagulation parameters (particularly FVIII:C) with moderate intensity aerobic exercise would be non-inferior to DDAVP. We additionally hypothesize that we will appreciate an additive effect of sequentially administering clinical implications for patients with MHA. It may negate the use of DDAVP pre- exercise and could potentially lead to clinicians advising patients to appropriately warm-up (e g running), to raise their FVIII/VWF levels prior to undertaking more rigorous sports. It will also lay the foundation for future studies investigating the interaction between aerobic exercise and hemostasis in subjects with bleeding disorders these interventions. Should our hypothesis be correct, our study would have significant clinical implications for patients with MHA. It may negate the use of DDAVP pre-exercise and could potentially lead to clinicians advising patients to appropriately warm-up to raise their FVIII/VWF levels prior to undertaking more rigorous sports. It will also lay the foundation for future studies investigating the interaction between aerobic exercise and hemostasis in subjects with bleeding disorders.

Mechanoregulation of von Willebrand Factor Inhibition and Activation

Mechanoregulation of von Willebrand Factor Inhibition and Activation

Year:
-
Grants:
Judith Graham Pool Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Von Willebrand Disease
Author(s):
Hongxia Fu
Per Dr. Fu, the JGP provided her with the opportunity to work on hemophilia, as well as von Willebrand disease. After the completion of her JGP project, Dr. Fu remained in the bleeding disorder field.
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Mothers' Perceived Vulnerability, Protective Behaviors and Stress in Relation to Their Sons with Hemophilia

Year: 2016
Grants:
Social Work Excellence Fellowship
Author(s):
Erin Stang

It is unknown if there are differences in attitudes and behaviors between mothers of sons with hemophilia who have a known family history of hemophilia compared to mothers without a known family history. To capture these differences, this study will measure mothers' perceived vulnerability of their sons, protective behaviors toward their sons and reported stress in the mother-son relationship. Sixty mothers will complete the following surveys: Parent Protection Scale, Child Vulnerability Scale and Parenting Stress Index/Short Form. The results of this data will influence clinic social work practice in the comprehensive care model at hemophilia treatment centers.

A Comprehensive and Unbiased Screen of ADAMTS13 Substrate Specificity

A Comprehensive and Unbiased Screen of ADAMTS13 Substrate Specificity

Year:
-
Grants:
Judith Graham Pool Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Von Willebrand Disease
Author(s):
Colin Kretz
Per Dr. Kretz, the JGP award came at an ideal point in his career. Through the JGP Program, the support of the NHF plays an important role in developing young and promising research in hematology and bleeding disorders. He is truly grateful for the support of the NHF during his training and considers the award to be an important moment in his career. The work supported by the JGP Fellowship led to two publications, one in PNAS and another in Scientific reports.
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The Use of High Resolution Power Doppler Musculoskeletal Ultrasound (MSKUS) in Bleeding Disorders

Year:
-
Grants:
Nursing Excellence Fellowship
Author(s):
Mary Lesh, Darcy Phelan

The project's ultimate goal is to expand nursing knowledge of hemarthrosis/soft-tissue bleeding detection by presenting our HTC's experience with how MSKUS improves accurate diagnosis and guides treatment of bleeding and other pain etiologies. By completing the retrospective data review, we hope that the experience of a large center HTC spanning both adults and pediatrics will be made available. We believe that the current restraints of MSKUS implementation include cost of equipment, operator certification, and quality of interpretation to guide interventions. Therefore, partnering with radiology experts may be helpful for other HTCs around the country when using this modality in the future. Our center's experience will show that collaboration with radiologists for real-time imaging is successful with nursing evaluation and coordination.

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Understanding the Interplay between Electron Transfer and VKOR Supported Blood Coagulation

Year:
-
Grants:
Judith Graham Pool Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Vitamin K
Author(s):
Wei Cheng
Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Platelet Therapy for Hemophilia A

Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Platelet Therapy for Hemophilia A

Year:
-
Grants:
Judith Graham Pool Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Platelets
Hemophilia A (Factor VIII/F8)
Author(s):
Ji Yoon Noh

Dr. Noh's research will utilize induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and manipulate them in vitro to expand production of megakaryocytes and platelets that express therapeutic proteins, including FVIII. The project will further determine whether this system of autologous platelets which overexpress FVIII can be delivered directly to the site of injury and hemorrhage, thereby circumventing and evading neutralization by alloantibody inhibitors in hemophilia A. Dr. Noh received her Ph.D. in Preventive Pharmacology from Seoul National University in South Korea. She has been a postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Mitchell Weiss' lab at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia since 2012. Dr. Noh is currently being mentored in this JGP project by Dr. Mortimer Poncz at CHOP.