NHF funds a broad range of research programs that seek to increase our understanding of the science behind bleeding disorders, how they affect people's lives, and pathways to better treatments and cures.

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Understanding the Interplay between Electron Transfer and VKOR Supported Blood Coagulation

Year:
-
Grants:
Judith Graham Pool Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Vitamin K
Author(s):
Wei Cheng
Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Platelet Therapy for Hemophilia A

Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Platelet Therapy for Hemophilia A

Year:
-
Grants:
Judith Graham Pool Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Platelets
Hemophilia A (Factor VIII/F8)
Author(s):
Ji Yoon Noh

Dr. Noh's research will utilize induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and manipulate them in vitro to expand production of megakaryocytes and platelets that express therapeutic proteins, including FVIII. The project will further determine whether this system of autologous platelets which overexpress FVIII can be delivered directly to the site of injury and hemorrhage, thereby circumventing and evading neutralization by alloantibody inhibitors in hemophilia A. Dr. Noh received her Ph.D. in Preventive Pharmacology from Seoul National University in South Korea. She has been a postdoctoral fellow in Dr. Mitchell Weiss' lab at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia since 2012. Dr. Noh is currently being mentored in this JGP project by Dr. Mortimer Poncz at CHOP.

In vivo Imaging of Bleeds in Hemophilia B

In vivo Imaging of Bleeds in Hemophilia B

Year:
-
Grants:
Judith Graham Pool Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Hemophilia B (Factor IX/F9)
Hemophilic Arthropathy
Pain
Author(s):
Elizabeth Chappell

Dr. Chappell's research project will develop a model for characterizing bleeding in hemophilia and particularly in joints. Using mouse models of hematoma formation and knee joint bleeding, Dr. Chappell will use 3D fluorescent imaging technology in "living" hemophilia B mice to better trace bleeding over time- from induction of a bleed to its resolution. This project will provide additional insights on the basic science underlying hemophilic bleeds, not to mention the optimal interventions and timing of treatment to potentially prevent damage caused by bleeds. Dr. Chappell earned her Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences from UNC Chapel Hill in 2013. She will pursue her research under the mentorship of Dr. Dougald Monroe, Professor in the Division of Hematology/Oncology, UNC School of Medicine and the UNC McAllister Heart Institute.

Bleeding Disorders Pediatric Pain Initiative

Bleeding Disorders Pediatric Pain Initiative

Year:
-
Grants:
Nursing Excellence Fellowship
Author(s):
Michelle Witkop

Pediatric pain, especially in the hemophilia population, is under-recognized and under-treated. Barriers to adequate treatment include lack of knowledge, variability of practice, and outmoded beliefs. All of these factors lead to a culture of slow to no change in practice patterns. Health care providers need current, state-ofthe- art education and tools to assist them in developing the skills required to assess and manage pain in children. Children are often given minimal or no analgesia for procedures that would be treated aggressively in adults. Although more is now known about pain management in children, this knowledge has not been widely or effectively translated into routine pediatric clinical practice, including the practice of most HTCs. In the bleeding disorders community, especially for those with hemophilia, children begin to experience frequent pokes secondary to frequent factor infusions and blood draws at an early age. Depending on the severity of their disorder, they may experience a poke daily or more frequently. This gives rise to anxiety for the child as well as their parents and other family members. Anticipatory anxiety is not uncommon in this setting. The child and their family often feel as though they have no control over the situation. A distraction box is filled with tools for providers to implement during any procedure involving children. The simple act of distraction (in whatever form) can significantly decrease pain and anxiety for both the child as well as their parent. This box offers multiple methods of distraction and informational videos on techniques. The focus of the Poke Plan is to give control over a painful or anxiety provoking situation back to the parent/child. The simple wallet card quickly educates any provider on how the child best handles the discomfort and anxiety associated with a poke/needlestick. Filling out the card educates the parents on distraction techniques that may be helpful for their child in painful and anxiety provoking situations. To date there have not been any studies done in this population. However centers in Michigan using similar Poke Plans in the general pediatric population include but not necessarily limited too are: Sparrow Hospital in Lansing Michigan, Munson Medical Center in Traverse City, Michigan as well as the University of Michigan Children and Women’s Hospital in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

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A Standardized Approach to Empowering Families with Hemophilia

Year: 2014
Grants:
Social Work Excellence Fellowship
Author(s):
Shannon Brown

Hemophilia is a rare lifelong condition which can be potentially life-threatening. Parents bare a significant responsibility for delivery of medical care because the treatment for hemophilia begins early in life for children within the home setting. As a result, parents frequently exhibit a heightened level of stress, anxiety, and subsequent trauma around the acceptance of the illness and the administration of medication management. To address the multifaceted nature of chronic illness for patients and their families, the ideal treatment utilizes a multidisciplinary team. Our proposed 3P Patient Parent Power Program aims to standardize care for families with patients of hemophilia using a tiered approach of psychosocial support. The necessary level of support will be provided to parents in order for them to successfully provide in-home prophylactic factor treatment. The goal of the program is to reduce parental stress and anxiety related to this chronic illness and increase feelings of empowerment for the parent and child.

Identification of Chemical and Genetic Modifiers of Bleeding Disorders Using a Zebrafish Model System

Identification of Chemical and Genetic Modifiers of Bleeding Disorders Using a Zebrafish Model System

Year:
-
Grants:
Career Development Award
Hemophilia A (Factor VIII/F8)
Hemophilia B (Factor IX/F9)
Author(s):
Jordan A. Shavit
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Prevalence of Gross Motor Delays in Children with Hemophilia

Year: 2014
Grants:
Physical Therapy Excellence Fellowship
Author(s):
Grace Hernandez

The purpose of this project is to determine if children with hemophilia have gross motor delays. Gross motor skills include, but are not limited to walking, running, jumping, climbing, crawling, balancing, kicking, catching and throwing activities. The large muscles of the body are responsible for performing these types of activities. Strength, balance and coordination are needed to demonstrate and improve these skills. Children with hemophilia may experience internal bleeding in their joints or muscles, which limits their activity. Some children with hemophilia may be restricted from active play or sports for fear of getting an injury that could cause internal bleeding. When activity is restricted, there can be decrease in strength, balance and endurance. If a child has gross motor delays, it puts him at risk for injury when playing with his peers. Physical Therapy evaluations in the Hemophilia Treatment Center help determine changes caused by bleeding episodes. There are specific motor skills children master as they grow, which represent strength, balance and coordination. The comprehensive clinic visits do not allow time to complete an intensive gross motor assessment. Physical Therapists use Manual Muscle Testing, MMT, to grade the strength of each muscle group. MMT strength testing is not appropriate for young children and does not represent strength during functional activities. To accurately determine children's muscle strengths, a standardized gross motor test should be used. The PT at the Comprehensive Care Center for Inherited Blood Disorders will conduct gross motor evaluations in conjunction with the annual visit. The scores will be evaluated to determine which patients have gross motor delays, so they can be referred for therapy services. The BOT 2 is the standardized gross motor test that will be used to determine gross motor levels. The gross motor skills that will be evaluated include bilateral coordination, balance, running speed and agility, upper limb coordination and strength. All patients with hemophilia between the ages of 4 and 12 years will be eligible to be evaluated in the upcoming year with additional PT testing with their annual visit. Patients may be referred to therapy or given a home exercise program depending on the deficits noted during the assessments. The goal is to improve our standard of care at the HTC, by adding gross motor screening for our patients to ensure appropriate referrals are made for therapy services.

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Telehealth Videoconferencing for Children with Hemophilia and Their Families: A Clinical Project

Year:
-
Grants:
Nursing Excellence Fellowship
Author(s):
Kimberly Jacobson

As technology advances and provides electronic tools for enhancing communication by phone and computer, health care providers are finding ways to adapt these tools into patient care. Telehealth is the use of electronic information and telecommunications technologies to support long-distance clinical health care. For patients with hemophilia who experience a bleed in the home setting, telehealth has the potential to help the patient, family, and health care provider assess what is going on and develop the best plan of care, all while the patient stays in the home setting. In this clinical project, we will use the telehealth resources available at our institution to partner with patients and families with severe hemophilia with a high risk of bleeding episode who also have a home computer with a camera and internet access. We want to find out more about how many patients have these home resources, how to use video-conferencing when managing a bleed and what patients, families, and health care staff think about using video conferencing. This will help us plan future research using telehealth video-conferencing for a larger group of hemophilia patients.

Biochemical Characterization of Vitamin K Epoxide Reductase

Biochemical Characterization of Vitamin K Epoxide Reductase

Year:
-
Grants:
Judith Graham Pool Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Vitamin K
Author(s):
Brian Ingram
In the long-term, Dr. Ivanciu's goals include the establishment of an independent research laboratory to focus on better understanding the pathological consequences of disruptions in the hemostatic balance. She believes that, as a past JGP Fellow, she is in a unique position to make meaningful contributions to the field of hematology and possibly help advance new therapies for the treatment of hemophilia.
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Understanding the Role of Spirituality and Religiosity among Adolescent Hemophilia Patients

Year: 2013
Grants:
Social Work Excellence Fellowship
Author(s):
Debra Honig

This study explores perceptions among adolescent aged patients with inherited bleeding disorders regarding religiosity/spirituality and whether their beliefs have an impact on the pain they experience. Subjects participating will be assessed in regards to the type, frequency and intensity of pain experienced and measures used to cope with the pain. Finally, we will measure patient self reports of disease self efficacy. To further assess the impact of religiosity/spirituality on the family system, we will be measuring parental perceptions of religiosity/spirituality with parents of the participating adolescents.

In vivo Selection of Hematopoietic Stem Cells that are Genetically-Modified to Express Platelet-FVIII for Hemophilia A Gene Therapy

In vivo Selection of Hematopoietic Stem Cells that are Genetically-Modified to Express Platelet-FVIII for Hemophilia A Gene Therapy

Year:
-
Grants:
Judith Graham Pool Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Gene Therapy
Platelets
Hemophilia A (Factor VIII/F8)
Author(s):
Yingyu Chen

The goal of Dr. Chen's research is to examine a method for selectively expanding hematopoietic stem cells expressing the factor VIII transgene. She will also examine the immune consequences of this approach, based on the idea that gene transfer in platelets evades immune recognition. This research has the potential to elicit important clues to developing an approach for gene therapy of hemophilia A and hemophilia A with inhibitors.

Dr. Chen earned a PhD in hematology from Fujian Medical University in China. She already has more than 27 papers published in the Chinese medical literature. Her research in hemophilia and gene therapy will be under the mentorship of Dr. Qizhen Shi, MD, PhD, Associate Investigator at the Blood Research Institute and Assistant Professor of Pediatric Hematology at the Medical College of Wisconsin.

Lorraine Flaherty

Identifying Fall Risk in Patients with Hemophilia

Year:
-
Grants:
Physical Therapy Excellence Fellowship
Author(s):
Lorraine Flaherty

This research project will examine fall history and fall risk in patients with hemophilia. Multiple risk factors for falls identified in the general population are prevalent in the hemophilia population. Existing data suggest that fall rates may be higher and that fall risk may begin at an earlier age in patients with hemophilia. Identification of fall risk enables early intervention, thereby preventing injury and fear of physical activity, both of which have been associated with falling and may carry an increased risk in patients with bleeding disorders.

Identification and Amelioration of T-cell Mediated Inflammatory Cytokines that Contribute to Anti-Factor VIII Inhibitor Formation in Hemophilia A

Identification and Amelioration of T-cell Mediated Inflammatory Cytokines that Contribute to Anti-Factor VIII Inhibitor Formation in Hemophilia A

Year:
-
Grants:
Career Development Award
Hemophilia A (Factor VIII/F8)
Inhibitors
Author(s):
Keri C. Smith

Dr. Smith's research focuses on better understanding the development of factor VIII inhibitors. Specifically, she will focus on the effects of chemical signals, or cytokines, secreted by helper T cells on the development of inhibitor antibodies. She hypothesizes that certain cells, called Th17 cells, play an important role in the development of these antibodies by stimulating inflammation and driving the immune response toward inhibitor production. Dr. Smith received a BS from the University of Delaware before earning her Ph.D. from Montana State University. Prior to her appointment as an Assistant Professor at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston, she spent four years as a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Michigan.

FXa Variants for Treatment of Hemophilia

FXa Variants for Treatment of Hemophilia

Year:
-
Grants:
Judith Graham Pool Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Hemophilia A (Factor VIII/F8)
Hemophilia B (Factor IX/F9)
Author(s):
Lacramioara Ivanciu
Per Dr. Ivanciu, the JGP award was the starting point of her career in the field of hemophilia. By receiving this award, she was able to advance her understanding of bleeding disorders and gained the necessary experience in state-of-the-art techniques in animals, molecular biology and biochemistry of clotting factors. All of this has prepared her for the next phase of her career.
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A Web-Based, Real-Time Menstrual Tracking Tool

Year:
-
Grants:
Nursing Excellence Fellowship
Author(s):
Carolyn Solomon

Menstrual cycles for females with bleeding disorders can present special challenges not experienced by other girls and women. Having your period can be physically, social and emotionally exhausting. A new web-based application is now available and can be downloaded to your personal mobile device or desktop computer. With this application you can track how long your period lasts, how much you are bleeding, any interventions utilized and how it is affecting your daily life. This is a new web-based application you can download that is free and available to all girls and women with bleeding disorders through their federally funded hemophilia treatment center (HTC).

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Resilience and Quality of Life in Individuals Aging with Hemophilia

Year:
-
Grants:
Social Work Excellence Fellowship
Author(s):
Karen Allen, Ellen Kachalsky

Individuals with hemophilia are living longer than previously expected because of advances in treatment, including the development of clotting factor replacement. However, we do not understand the psychological and emotional impact of aging with hemophilia, how this affects quality of life, and how resilience and healthy coping skills are developed and maintained. For example, we do not know if persons with hemophilia: (a) retire early because of having a disability, although this may be a reasonable assumption; (b) if they are financially secure; and (c) how much joint damage impacts the ability to move, walk, and perform everyday activities. We also do not know what special challenges arise from aging with hemophilia, and if this leads to more divorces, an increase in living alone, and a greater need for help to remain independent. There is little research showing which traits help persons with hemophilia continue to mature, and keep an emotional balance while dealing with a lifelong, chronic condition and how all these traits improve or reduce quality of life.

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Gait Parameters of People with Hemophilia Compared to Normal Control Subjects

Year:
-
Grants:
Physical Therapy Excellence Fellowship
Author(s):
Nancy Durben

The objective of this study is to collect a large data base of gait parameters on individuals from the age of 12 months to 99 years old who do not have neuromotor deficits. This ongoing study will be the basis of comparison for people with hemophilia as a means to identify gait deficits that occur due to joint or muscle involvement from the bleeding disorder as compared to gender and age matched controls. We are using the GaitRite electronic walkway evaluation system as the quantitative measurement tool for gait analysis. Enrolled subjects are consented to this study and to the storage of data in a gait repository for future studies. This data will be available to other Hemophilia Treatment Centers upon written request to our Gait Repository Guardian (currently Dave Oleson, PT at the Hemophilia Treatment Center at CDRC in Portland, OR).

Fine Structure-Function Mapping VWF-FVIII Interaction

Fine Structure-Function Mapping VWF-FVIII Interaction

Year:
-
Grants:
Judith Graham Pool Postdoctoral Research Fellowship
Von Willebrand Disease
Hemophilia A (Factor VIII/F8)
Author(s):
Andrew Yee

Dr. Yee earned his undergraduate Credentials from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute before receiving his doctorate from Rice University. His eventual goal is to operate an independent research laboratory in the field of bioengineering with a focus on understanding molecular mechanisms of hemostasis, thrombosis and vascular diseases. Dr. Yee's research project deals with factor VIII and its adhesion to its chaperone protein, von Willebrand factor. In these experiments, fragments of von Willebrand factor are screened for optimal factor VIII stabilization. By further studying the architecture of the "Factor VIII-von Willebrand Factor" complex, Dr. Yee seeks to gain insight to improve designs of novel therapeutics.

A New Approach for a New Generation

A New Approach for a New Generation

Year:
-
Grants:
Nursing Excellence Fellowship
Author(s):
Linda Grooms
The primary purpose of our project will be to provide education that is specific to adolescent females diagnosed with a bleeding disorder. Most of the information available in the bleeding community is gender specific to males, age specific to adults and focused on von Wilebrand Disease and not platelet dysfunctions. In order for these young girls to form a concrete knowledge base that they can build upon through their adult life, they need additional educational resources for their diagnosis and prescribed therapy as well as support.
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Socialization of Adult Men with Hereditary Bleeding Disorders and the Role of Spouse and Significant Other

Year:
-
Grants:
Social Work Excellence Fellowship
Author(s):
Christine Mitchell

The purpose of this pilot study is to characterize social integration of persons with congenital bleeding disorders (PWCBD), specifically adult males with hemophilia A or B. Due to early onset of bleeding symptoms, they are predisposed to acute, life-threatening bleeding, bleeding complications, risk for long-term disabling hemophilic arthropathy, and blood-borne infections. A European study has shown that adult males with hemophilia have inferior socialization as measured by work, work disability and health-related quality of life when compared to adult men in the general population. We hypothesize that a broader view of socialization components also contribute to quality of life. We also propose that the role of the spouse or significant other may have relevance for current social work goals in providing comprehensive care for adult PWCBD.